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Product School Launches 8 New Locations!

We are thrilled to announce our latest grand expansion into eight new locations including two new countries.

Carlos, our CEO started Product School with the vision to build the first tech school to support aspiring product managers in mastering the skills and landing their dream job. Even then, it was clear that the title “Product Manager” had become the most trending career in tech and will continue to be so.  But throughout this past year, we’ve seen just how far the product community has reached.

That’s why we are excited about bringing our course to these new cities. 

Product School Launches 8 New Locations!

Coming up in 2018, we’ll be teaching product management in Seattle, Chicago, Austin, Denver, Boulder, Boston, Toronto, and London!

 

Here’s everything you need to know:

 

Seattle

We’re hosting our first event in Seattle on Thursday, December 7, 2017. Get tickets here.

The first cohort will begin on February 24th – April 14th, on Saturdays from 9:30am – 3:30pm.

Learn more here.

 

Chicago

We’re hosting our first event in Chicago on Thursday, December 7, 2017. Get tickets here.

The first cohort will begin on February 24th – April 14th, on Saturdays from 9:30am – 3:30pm.

Learn more here.

 

Austin

We’re hosting our first event in Austin on Tuesday, December 5, 2017. Get tickets here.

The first cohort will begin on February 24th – April 14th, on Saturdays from 9:30am – 3:30pm.

Learn more here.

 

Denver

We’re hosting our first event in Denver on Wednesday, November 29, 2017. Get tickets here.

The first cohort will begin on March 24th – May 12th, on Saturdays from 9:30am – 3:30pm.

Learn more here.

 

Boulder

We’re hosting our first event in Boulder on Thursday, November 30, 2017. Get tickets here.

The first cohort will begin on June 2nd – July 28th, on Saturdays from 9:30am – 3:30pm.

Learn more here.

 

Boston

We’re hosting our first event in Boston on Wednesday, December 13, 2017. Get tickets here.

The first cohort will begin on February 24th – April 14th, on Saturdays from 9:30am – 3:30pm.

Learn more here.

 

Toronto

We hosted our first event in Toronto on Thursday, December 7, 2017.

The first cohort will begin on March 17th – May 5th, on Saturdays from 9:30am – 3:30pm. 

Learn more here.

 

London

We’re hosting our first event in London on Wednesday, January 10, 2018. Get tickets here.

The first cohort will begin on March 3rd – April 21st, on Saturdays from 9:30am – 3:30pm. 

Learn more here.

 

 

Have any comments? Tweet us @ProductSchool 

The Product Book has arrived! Learn how to become a great Product Manager. On sale for a limited time. Get your copy here http://amzn.to/2uJqg9A 

We teach product management courses in San Francisco, Santa Clara, Los Angeles, and New York. To learn more about our upcoming courses and how to apply click over to our course page.

Announcing our Product Management Black Friday Special

We are excited to announce the launch of our huge Black Friday promotion for our fantastic community.

Anyone that applies for our three-course bundle and successfully enrolls by Black Friday, November 24, will be eligible for a tuition savings of $4,000! That means when you enroll in all three courses, you will only pay for two, and take the third course at no additional cost.

If you’ve been waiting to submit your application, now is the time to take action. Don’t wait much longer, spots are limited.

Apply Now

We get a lot of questions about our three-course bundle, so here’s a quick FAQ to help answer them. If you are looking for more information, make sure you ask our Admissions Team during your interview. 

 

Announcing our Product Management Black Friday Special

 

Do I have to take all three courses at the same time?

No, not at all. You can overlap courses if you prefer, and you can also take each course at separate times, for a full 24 week program. We suggest reviewing our calendar to see what aligns well with yours.

What kind of payment plans do you offer?

We offer interest-free payment plans and flexible options. Our Admissions Team will be able to put together a personalized plan for you.

Can I use this coupon for cohorts starting later than November 24th?

Yes, of course! You can choose which dates and cohorts work best for you. You just have to be enrolled by November 24th.

How much is the course bundle?

Each course is $3,995 which means, separately, the total would be almost $12,000 ($11,985). But with our Black Friday discount, you can take all three for $7,995.

Which location can I use the discount for?

The discount is available in San Francisco, Los Angeles, and New York.

 

Have any comments? Tweet us @ProductSchool 

The Product Book has arrived! Learn how to become a great Product Manager. On sale for a limited time. Get your copy here http://amzn.to/2uJqg9A 

We teach product management courses in San Francisco, Santa Clara, Los Angeles, and New York. To learn more about our upcoming courses and how to apply click over to our course page.

Building Search Products by LinkedIn Product Manager

Are you curious about what it takes to build search products? Both Facebook and LinkedIn, and many more tech companies put a ton of effort into this. Why should you waste your time on thinking about search, discovery and search products?  

LinkedIn’s Group Product Manager gave us some powerful insights during her recent talk. 

 

 

Group Product Manager at LinkedIn

Shakhina Pulatova is a product leader whose passion lies at the intersection of product management and Artificial Intelligence. Throughout her career, she launched innovative products deeply rooted in Search, machine learning, NLP, predictive analytics and recommendation systems.

Currently, Shakhina is a Group Product Manager at LinkedIn, where she has been leading Search and Discovery, and (more recently) profile and reputation products. Previously, she led the Discovery product team at Eventbrite and drove machine translation at eBay. Shakhina holds a Bachelor’s and Master’s Degree in Computer Science.

 

Search Basics

Shakhina gave an overview of the search and discovery problem and explained what intent means. She presented LinkedIn’s approach to navigating and exploring its economic graph using search technologies. She also highlighted how LinkedIn uses machine learning to model user intent, understand user query, and rank search results to deliver personalized experiences.

Building Search Products by LinkedIn Product Manager

 

Bullet points:

  • Search is a computational problem that requires finding a solution.
  • Search is finding something when not even looking.
  • The main thing is that we search to find and explore to discover.
  • An example of constant search is natural selection and the evolution.
  • The concept of intent is in the core of search and around it we have the strength of intent, effort, consideration, control and specificity.
  • Search is about finding the truth:
    • An important concept in the world of search is precision.
    • When searching we want the whole truth and nothing but the truth.
  • At LinkedIn:
    • Through search can one find a LinkedIn’s member’s dream jobs or connect them to the right people and learning content.
    • The heart is in opportunity.
    • Intent is divided into navigational and exploratory search fields.
  • The stages of finding and discovering opportunity are
    • Understand/predict intent
    • Find & present answers.
    • Go beyond & inspire more questions. 

 

Have any comments? Tweet us @ProductSchool 

The Product Book has arrived! Learn how to become a great Product Manager. On sale for a limited time. Get your copy here http://amzn.to/2uJqg9A 

We teach product management courses in San Francisco, Santa Clara, Los Angeles, and New York. To learn more about our upcoming courses and how to apply click over to our course page.

Building Products for the Blind by Sidewalk Labs’ Engineer

Speaking to your target users is critical when building and developing a product. By doing user research, you get tons of valuable information about your users and their habits. When building products for the blind you need to know how easy they would find your product to use.

Neha Rathi from the Sidewalk Labs talked about her two projects building products for the blind.

 

 

Engineer at Sidewalk Labs

Neha Rathi is the primary front-end developer for Flow, Sidewalk Labs‘ mobility subsidiary. Before joining Flow, Neha worked on Google Maps in San Francisco. At Google, she was responsible for the “popular times” feature as well as keyboard exploration, a screen-reader-compatible tool that makes Maps more accessible for visually impaired users.

Neha holds a B.S. in Computer Science and M.S. in Human-Computer Interaction. In her free time, she enjoys running, cooking, and traveling.

 

How to Build Products for the Blind?

In this recent event, Neha talked about a few projects she worked on for the visually impaired. The first was in collaboration with TechBridgeWorld, an organization that facilitated the implementation of accessible technologies for developing communities. The second was during her time at Google Maps.

She discussed how working at a larger company is not at odds with building what you’re passionate about. Also, rethinking a core feature is normal because thoughtful iteration can lead to dramatically better experiences.

Building Products for the Blind by Sidewalk Labs' Engineer

 

Bullet points:

  • 1 in 5 Americans has a disability. 28 million Americans have vision or motor control skills disabilities that prevent them from traditionally using the keyboard or mouse.
  • Accessibility is not a niche. There is a considerable population you serve to gain by making your product accessible.
  • Three reasons why to make your product accessible.
    • Compliance: Accessibility is a right.
    • Competitive advantage: The community talks – if your product is the first of its kind you’ll have a very active and loyal user base.
    • Compassion: Because it’s the right thing to do.
  • Accessibility can be a differentiator for some customers.
  • To make your product accessible, you need to do lots of user testing.
  • While user testing, empathize with your users and their norms.
  • “Organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful.” -Google.
  • Four technical principles at Google.
    • Add labels/roles.
    • Handle key presses.
    • Enforce tab order.
    • Maintain focus.
  • Don’t be afraid to get creative. There is no fast way to make a map, for example, accessible.
  • When you put your product out there, you’ll have lots of people willing to help you. 

 

Have any comments? Tweet us @ProductSchool 

The Product Book has arrived! Learn how to become a great Product Manager. On sale for a limited time. Get your copy here http://amzn.to/2uJqg9A 

We teach product management courses in San Francisco, Santa Clara, Los Angeles, and New York. To learn more about our upcoming courses and how to apply click over to our course page.

Creating World Class Products by former Nike Product Expert

Nike is the world’s largest supplier of athletic shoes and apparel. They have stores all over the world, and the most famous athletes wear their products. So, what is it like to work as a Product Expert at Nike? Ramin Schultz, the Product Expert in the AGS region, shed some light into this and shared why Nike is a top-class company.

 

 

Former Product Expert at Nike

From a young age, Ramin Schultz has always been inspired by sports and marketing. After working for Puma, he landed his dream job with Nike to be the brand representative. Ramin then worked his way to being the Product Expert in the AGS (Austria, Germany, Switzerland) region.

He recently moved to LA to work as the Marketing Director for the start-up Swoop. Ramin holds a Bachelor’s Degree in International Business Administration and a Masters Degree in International Business Management.

 

How to Create World Class Products?

In this recent event, Ramin shared his story and insights about his time being a product expert and brand representative at Nike. Working in booming Nike European Market, Ramin was an integral part of many essential product launches in Berlin working together with athletes, influencers, and consumers.

He worked from educating small retail shops to consulting world-class athletes in Rio during the Olympic Games in 2016. He talked about the Nike timeline and the significant innovations that Nike has brought to the sporting world.

Creating World Class Products by former Nike Product Expert

 

Bullet points:

  • “The heart of Nike is to make athletes better.” The product is always about making the athletes jump a little higher, run a little bit faster and be a little bit lighter.
  • Nike has had a secret department working for it since the 80s. It consists of a group of product experts on the market that they call EKIN’s.
  • EKIN is divided into different categories, such as soccer, performance, running, and lifestyle. Often other categories come up with the innovation and if it works the lifestyle takes it into their selection.
  • The EKIN’s communicate with consumers, retailers, entertainers, etc. to receive vital feedback that will help the company improve and change the product, and to come up with innovations and products.
  • Nike has come up with great inventions over the years, such as the Zoom Air shoe (1995) and Vapor Max (2017). They use a mix of inventing something new together with innovating.
  • Some Nike apparel technologies’ inventions are pulling the sweat away, drying quickly and for being lightweight and breathable. 

 

Have any comments? Tweet us @ProductSchool 

The Product Book has arrived! Learn how to become a great Product Manager. On sale for a limited time. Get your copy here http://amzn.to/2uJqg9A 

We teach product management courses in San Francisco, Santa Clara, Los Angeles, and New York. To learn more about our upcoming courses and how to apply click over to our course page.

Solving Problems by Using Products with Google Product Manager

Why do we need products? What do we use them for? Rakesh Goyal from Google talked at a recent event about how people don’t really want products, they want solutions to their problems. To solve problems, we need to think why and how we build because essentially products are for people.  

 

 

Product Manager at Google

Rakesh Goyal has been working at Google for 6+ years. Before that, he was in college studying Marketing. Having worked in various capacity – customer support/sales, software development, program management and currently, product management – he has seen product development through various lenses. He has been leading early-stage products and has seen them through experimentation, launches, successes, and failures.

 

People don’t want to buy a quarter-inch drill

They want a quarter inch hole. This is a profound insight. Customers don’t want products; they want solutions to their problems. All great products are built around profound insights. In a recent talk, Rakesh shared some examples of successful products and the foundational insight on which they were built. Through examples he talked about how you can develop an intuition for discovering foundational insights upon which you can build your next product.

Solving Problems by Using Products with Google Product Manager

 

Key points:

  • Two important attributes that a Product Managers should have are leadership and product intuition.
  • Leadership:
    • The product manager is responsible for the overall end-to-end experience received by the user, such as the box the product is in, software and customer support.
    • A product manager needs to be able to make bold decisions and convince the others to see what he/she sees.
    • Guide the product in the right direction by prioritization.
  • Product intuition:
  • Snapchat example: teens needed to communicate without the adults seeing everything. Compared to Facebook, Snapchat is more personal. Facebook was designed for permanent and perfection-seeking content.
  • Airbnb example: people value homestay experience over the impersonal hotel. They are comfortable sleeping in “strangers’” houses and hosting others for less high prices. Airbnb neutralized the trust advantage of hotels.
  • Three ways to identify customers jobs
    • Jobs in your own life
    • Non consumption
    • Workarounds
  • 3 key things to address in your product
    • Current friction/struggle (e.g., SMS vs. free WhatsApp messages).
    • The anxiety of the unknown (trust in hotels vs. trust in Airbnb).
    • Current habits (phone calls vs. free WhatsApp calls).
  • Books to read more about the topic:

 

Have any comments? Tweet us @ProductSchool 

The Product Book has arrived! Learn how to become a great Product Manager. On sale for a limited time. Get your copy here http://amzn.to/2uJqg9A 

We teach product management courses in San Francisco, Santa Clara, Los Angeles, and New York. To learn more about our upcoming courses and how to apply click over to our course page.