Webinars on Mountain View

All  |   Workshops   |   Webinars

Treat Your Resume As a Product by eBay Sr. Technical Product Manager

Building your resume can be an overwhelming task. From the layout, design, font styles and your list of experiences. What are the most important factors?

Senior Technical Product Manager at eBay advises you to treat your resume as a product. Develop it using the same mindset you would when building a product.

Here are other crucial tips that she shared with our community of aspiring product managers.

 

Treat Your Resume As a Product by eBay Sr. Technical Product ManagerShanea King-Roberson

Shanea is currently the Senior Technical Product Manager at eBay. Before this, she worked at Google from 2013 to 2017 holding multiple positions including Technical Product Manager and Product/Program Manager. Shanea holds a Bachelors in Computer Science, and in Business.

 

 

Why and how did you break into product management?

Before Google, I was a product analyst. Then I started a digital marketing agency. I actually started as an AdWords community manager answering questions on the forum, so I was learning about customers for about six months. Then I became a program manager in the developer relations department for about two years where I led online training for developers.

That’s when I decided I wanted to be a Product Manager, but I didn’t work on technical products. I started with a degree in Business and then taught myself to code. Now I’m back in school getting a CS degree.

 

What is the distinction between Technical Product Manager vs. Product Manager?

A technical product manager is expected to work on actual software. This can be anything including API’s. It wasn’t easy to transition. It took about a good solid six months to a year of interviewing to get the job.

 

What did you do to show that you could code?

I talked about technical projects. I didn’t have technical projects at first. So, I found a job that allowed me to work on something technical.

 

In your current position, are you expected to code?

No, I’m not expected to code, but I am expected to know how software works and make tradeoffs.

 

In what ways did you learn to code on your own?

I took every online course under the sun. But what many people don’t talk about is the current online courses don’t teach you fundamental skills, such as, computational thinking, logic, whole systems, etc. It only leaves you with a bunch of gaps in enterprise software which is why I went back to get a CS degree.

 

Do you know any particular books, websites, etc. that would be helpful?

Cracking the Product Manager Interview was helpful. Find a friend in product that you can practice interviewing with, go to events and listen to speakers.

Treat Your Resume As a Product by eBay Sr. Technical Product Manager

 

What are some of the most frequently used skills in your daily job?

Convincing people that my ideas are the way to go. Also, politics, influencing and presenting to folks while looking confident.

 

Did you report into Marketing or Software Development organization?

I reported into engineering.

Any tips or on how to increase my involvement in the products’ success without overstepping sales?

You are ultimately responsible for your product. You need to make sales your partners. Don’t side step just do stuff together.

 

What are the differences between being a Product Manager in the area you were at Google vs. eBay?

The culture is very different between Google and eBay. Google has a bunch of money, so Product Managers have more autonomy. At eBay, there’s more process.

 

Do you work with other Product Managers as a Technical Product Manager?

Yes, I work with other product managers. The technical vs. non-technical is different at every company. I can have conversations with engineers and make technical products.

 

I have a CS degree, MBA and sales experience, but no product experience. What can I do next?

If you have a CS, MBA, and sales, go build a product on your own. Even if it fails, you can position it as learning.

Treat Your Resume As a Product by eBay Sr. Technical Product Manager

What methods do you utilize for understanding customer needs?

Talking to them, pretending that I know nothing and feeling what it feels like to be them. Many times customers don’t know what they want.

 

What are the prerequisites regarding experience/skill to ace the product manager interview?

You need to have all of the skill sets. If you don’t, someone else will.

 

What do you think are the biggest differences between Project and Product Management?

Product Managers are responsible for the vision in addition to execution. Project Managers only execute in general.

 

Do you feel that being a technical Product Manager is being more tactical or strategic?

It depends on what level you are at. At junior levels, you are responsible for execution. At more senior levels you are responsible for strategy. You build your strategy skills by building a bunch of stuff.

 

You’re said customers don’t know what they want. Can you elaborate?

Sometimes customers can’t articulate what they want when you are building something that has never been built before. If you are just following the crowd, then it will be easy for customers to articulate.

 

Should I continue looking for PM roles or switch to other roles like BA and later switch within the organization?

Sure some knowledge on business models, making payments easier. Without money in the business, you won’t have a product to manage. Tools are not the problem you need to find whatever works and is the least barrier to entry in your organization. It depends on the company.

 

What would you suggest emphasizing in your resume?

Product Manager job descriptions are always very similar, and LinkedIn is just like Google search. Check the keywords and SEO in a job description and put those things on your resume. You have to start thinking of your resume as a product. Tools and 1-2 skills aren’t the right questions.

The right questions are what is going to make me stand out among all of the other product managers? Do I have something to highlight? Should I get skills on my own? What features do I need to add so that it can compete in the marketplace? What “research” do I need to do? Recruiters are lazy, make their job easier.

Treat Your Resume As a Product by eBay Sr. Technical Product Manager

Do you think it is important for Product Managers to have a technical background?

It is possible to get a job without a technical background. Absolutely. But you are competing with everyone else that also don’t have a tech background. If you do have a tech background the numbers of jobs, you qualify for increases. It’s just a numbers game. I think it’s only important if you want a job at a traditional tech company the Googles and Facebooks of the world.

It depends on the company you are applying for. If you were applying for Eventbrite sure if you were applying to Google then no also there is another option that people forget. Get a job at the company you want and then transition into Product Management.

 

Would you tell recruiters that at some point, you’ll be willing to transition to a product manager role?

No, I would not tell them that eventually, you want to transition into PM. Trust me tried that. failed miserably

 

Have you ever had to do a take-home product challenge?

Yes. Complete it like you would your job if you find that you want that job.

 

Do you manage just one product or a set of products?

I manage a set of products. I lead all of our efforts for large merchants and brands.

 

My boss wants me to move into product. I have a design/tech background and no previous experience in Product. Is this the right way to start?

Sounds good! Keep at it and doing the best that you can. Keep learning and being curious. Think two steps ahead.

 

What can I do to have the best chances of getting hired?

Build a product and learn to scale. Even if it fails to talk about what you learned. Expertise, they need a PM, you were the best person for the job.

 

How would you go about gaining Scrum experience and skill sets if your current company projects don’t use Agile? Are Scrum Master certifications reputable?

Yes, scrum master certs are reputable. I believe in getting whatever you need to give yourself an edge. Remember, treat your resume as a product.

Treat Your Resume As a Product by eBay Sr. Technical Product Manager

Any suggestions for building a new technology that doesn’t have existing users?

Ah! That is what I love. Building from scratch. You need something to communicate your ideas. It will be a classic chicken and egg. It’s up to you to make agile tradeoffs.

 

At what point do you hand off to design? Do you do wireframing yourself as well?

No one knows what that is yet, your design, the need for it, why they would pull out their cc’s, but you have a finite set of resources/funding. You need to balance all of those things incrementally.

 

Any piece of advice for aspiring product managers?

Someone told me that I could do it and that’s all I needed! Think about what will make you better. Do that thing. Invest in yourself.

 

Have any comments? Tweet us @ProductSchool 

The Product Book has arrived! Learn how to become a great Product Manager. On sale for a limited time. Get your copy here http://amzn.to/2uJqg9A 

We teach product management courses in San Francisco, Santa Clara, Los Angeles, and New York. To learn more about our upcoming courses and how to apply click over to our course page.

Product School Launches 8 New Locations!

We are thrilled to announce our latest grand expansion into eight new locations including two new countries.

Carlos, our CEO started Product School with the vision to build the first tech school to support aspiring product managers in mastering the skills and landing their dream job. Even then, it was clear that the title “Product Manager” had become the most trending career in tech and will continue to be so.  But throughout this past year, we’ve seen just how far the product community has reached.

That’s why we are excited about bringing our course to these new cities. 

Product School Launches 8 New Locations!

Coming up in 2018, we’ll be teaching product management in Seattle, Chicago, Austin, Denver, Boulder, Boston, Toronto, and London!

Here’s everything you need to know:

Seattle

We’re hosting our first event in Seattle on Thursday, December 7, 2017. Get tickets here.

The first cohort will begin on February 24th – April 14th, on Saturdays from 9:30am – 3:30pm.

Learn more here.

Chicago

We’re hosting our first event in Chicago on Thursday, December 7, 2017. Get tickets here.

The first cohort will begin on February 24th – April 14th, on Saturdays from 9:30am – 3:30pm.

Learn more here.

Austin

We’re hosting our first event in Austin on Tuesday, December 5, 2017. Get tickets here.

The first cohort will begin on February 24th – April 14th, on Saturdays from 9:30am – 3:30pm.

Learn more here.

Denver

We’re hosting our first event in Denver on Wednesday, November 29, 2017. Get tickets here.

The first cohort will begin on March 24th – May 12th, on Saturdays from 9:30am – 3:30pm.

Learn more here.

Boulder

We’re hosting our first event in Boulder on Thursday, November 30, 2017. Get tickets here.

The first cohort will begin on June 2nd – July 28th, on Saturdays from 9:30am – 3:30pm.

Learn more here.

Boston

We’re hosting our first event in Boston on Wednesday, December 13, 2017. Get tickets here.

The first cohort will begin on February 24th – April 14th, on Saturdays from 9:30am – 3:30pm.

Learn more here.

Toronto

We hosted our first event in Toronto on Thursday, December 7, 2017.

The first cohort will begin on March 17th – May 5th, on Saturdays from 9:30am – 3:30pm. 

Learn more here.

London

We’re hosting our first event in London on Wednesday, January 10, 2018. Get tickets here.

The first cohort will begin on March 3rd – April 21st, on Saturdays from 9:30am – 3:30pm. 

Learn more here.

Have any comments? Tweet us @ProductSchool 

The Product Book has arrived! Learn how to become a great Product Manager. On sale for a limited time. Get your copy here http://amzn.to/2uJqg9A 

We teach product management courses in San Francisco, Santa Clara, Los Angeles, and New York. To learn more about our upcoming courses and how to apply click over to our course page.

Announcing our Product Management Black Friday Special

We are excited to announce the launch of our huge Black Friday promotion for our fantastic community.

Anyone that applies for our three-course bundle and successfully enrolls by Black Friday, November 24, will be eligible for a tuition savings of $4,000! That means when you enroll in all three courses, you will only pay for two, and take the third course at no additional cost.

If you’ve been waiting to submit your application, now is the time to take action. Don’t wait much longer, spots are limited.

Apply Now

We get a lot of questions about our three-course bundle, so here’s a quick FAQ to help answer them. If you are looking for more information, make sure you ask our Admissions Team during your interview. 

 

Announcing our Product Management Black Friday Special

 

Do I have to take all three courses at the same time?

No, not at all. You can overlap courses if you prefer, and you can also take each course at separate times, for a full 24 week program. We suggest reviewing our calendar to see what aligns well with yours.

What kind of payment plans do you offer?

We offer interest-free payment plans and flexible options. Our Admissions Team will be able to put together a personalized plan for you.

Can I use this coupon for cohorts starting later than November 24th?

Yes, of course! You can choose which dates and cohorts work best for you. You just have to be enrolled by November 24th.

How much is the course bundle?

Each course is $3,995 which means, separately, the total would be almost $12,000 ($11,985). But with our Black Friday discount, you can take all three for $7,995.

Which location can I use the discount for?

The discount is available in San Francisco, Los Angeles, and New York.

 

Have any comments? Tweet us @ProductSchool 

The Product Book has arrived! Learn how to become a great Product Manager. On sale for a limited time. Get your copy here http://amzn.to/2uJqg9A 

We teach product management courses in San Francisco, Santa Clara, Los Angeles, and New York. To learn more about our upcoming courses and how to apply click over to our course page.

Building Search Products by LinkedIn Product Manager

Are you curious about what it takes to build search products? Both Facebook and LinkedIn, and many more tech companies put a ton of effort into this. Why should you waste your time on thinking about search, discovery and search products?  

LinkedIn’s Group Product Manager gave us some powerful insights during her recent talk. 

 

 

Group Product Manager at LinkedIn

Shakhina Pulatova is a product leader whose passion lies at the intersection of product management and Artificial Intelligence. Throughout her career, she launched innovative products deeply rooted in Search, machine learning, NLP, predictive analytics and recommendation systems.

Currently, Shakhina is a Group Product Manager at LinkedIn, where she has been leading Search and Discovery, and (more recently) profile and reputation products. Previously, she led the Discovery product team at Eventbrite and drove machine translation at eBay. Shakhina holds a Bachelor’s and Master’s Degree in Computer Science.

 

Search Basics

Shakhina gave an overview of the search and discovery problem and explained what intent means. She presented LinkedIn’s approach to navigating and exploring its economic graph using search technologies. She also highlighted how LinkedIn uses machine learning to model user intent, understand user query, and rank search results to deliver personalized experiences.

Building Search Products by LinkedIn Product Manager

 

Bullet points:

  • Search is a computational problem that requires finding a solution.
  • Search is finding something when not even looking.
  • The main thing is that we search to find and explore to discover.
  • An example of constant search is natural selection and the evolution.
  • The concept of intent is in the core of search and around it we have the strength of intent, effort, consideration, control and specificity.
  • Search is about finding the truth:
    • An important concept in the world of search is precision.
    • When searching we want the whole truth and nothing but the truth.
  • At LinkedIn:
    • Through search can one find a LinkedIn’s member’s dream jobs or connect them to the right people and learning content.
    • The heart is in opportunity.
    • Intent is divided into navigational and exploratory search fields.
  • The stages of finding and discovering opportunity are
    • Understand/predict intent
    • Find & present answers.
    • Go beyond & inspire more questions. 

 

Have any comments? Tweet us @ProductSchool 

The Product Book has arrived! Learn how to become a great Product Manager. On sale for a limited time. Get your copy here http://amzn.to/2uJqg9A 

We teach product management courses in San Francisco, Santa Clara, Los Angeles, and New York. To learn more about our upcoming courses and how to apply click over to our course page.

Building Products for the Blind by Sidewalk Labs’ Engineer

Speaking to your target users is critical when building and developing a product. By doing user research, you get tons of valuable information about your users and their habits. When building products for the blind you need to know how easy they would find your product to use.

Neha Rathi from the Sidewalk Labs talked about her two projects building products for the blind.

 

 

Engineer at Sidewalk Labs

Neha Rathi is the primary front-end developer for Flow, Sidewalk Labs‘ mobility subsidiary. Before joining Flow, Neha worked on Google Maps in San Francisco. At Google, she was responsible for the “popular times” feature as well as keyboard exploration, a screen-reader-compatible tool that makes Maps more accessible for visually impaired users.

Neha holds a B.S. in Computer Science and M.S. in Human-Computer Interaction. In her free time, she enjoys running, cooking, and traveling.

 

How to Build Products for the Blind?

In this recent event, Neha talked about a few projects she worked on for the visually impaired. The first was in collaboration with TechBridgeWorld, an organization that facilitated the implementation of accessible technologies for developing communities. The second was during her time at Google Maps.

She discussed how working at a larger company is not at odds with building what you’re passionate about. Also, rethinking a core feature is normal because thoughtful iteration can lead to dramatically better experiences.

Building Products for the Blind by Sidewalk Labs' Engineer

 

Bullet points:

  • 1 in 5 Americans has a disability. 28 million Americans have vision or motor control skills disabilities that prevent them from traditionally using the keyboard or mouse.
  • Accessibility is not a niche. There is a considerable population you serve to gain by making your product accessible.
  • Three reasons why to make your product accessible.
    • Compliance: Accessibility is a right.
    • Competitive advantage: The community talks – if your product is the first of its kind you’ll have a very active and loyal user base.
    • Compassion: Because it’s the right thing to do.
  • Accessibility can be a differentiator for some customers.
  • To make your product accessible, you need to do lots of user testing.
  • While user testing, empathize with your users and their norms.
  • “Organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful.” -Google.
  • Four technical principles at Google.
    • Add labels/roles.
    • Handle key presses.
    • Enforce tab order.
    • Maintain focus.
  • Don’t be afraid to get creative. There is no fast way to make a map, for example, accessible.
  • When you put your product out there, you’ll have lots of people willing to help you. 

 

Have any comments? Tweet us @ProductSchool 

The Product Book has arrived! Learn how to become a great Product Manager. On sale for a limited time. Get your copy here http://amzn.to/2uJqg9A 

We teach product management courses in San Francisco, Santa Clara, Los Angeles, and New York. To learn more about our upcoming courses and how to apply click over to our course page.

Creating World Class Products by former Nike Product Expert

Nike is the world’s largest supplier of athletic shoes and apparel. They have stores all over the world, and the most famous athletes wear their products. So, what is it like to work as a Product Expert at Nike? Ramin Schultz, the Product Expert in the AGS region, shed some light into this and shared why Nike is a top-class company.

 

 

Former Product Expert at Nike

From a young age, Ramin Schultz has always been inspired by sports and marketing. After working for Puma, he landed his dream job with Nike to be the brand representative. Ramin then worked his way to being the Product Expert in the AGS (Austria, Germany, Switzerland) region.

He recently moved to LA to work as the Marketing Director for the start-up Swoop. Ramin holds a Bachelor’s Degree in International Business Administration and a Masters Degree in International Business Management.

 

How to Create World Class Products?

In this recent event, Ramin shared his story and insights about his time being a product expert and brand representative at Nike. Working in booming Nike European Market, Ramin was an integral part of many essential product launches in Berlin working together with athletes, influencers, and consumers.

He worked from educating small retail shops to consulting world-class athletes in Rio during the Olympic Games in 2016. He talked about the Nike timeline and the significant innovations that Nike has brought to the sporting world.

Creating World Class Products by former Nike Product Expert

 

Bullet points:

  • “The heart of Nike is to make athletes better.” The product is always about making the athletes jump a little higher, run a little bit faster and be a little bit lighter.
  • Nike has had a secret department working for it since the 80s. It consists of a group of product experts on the market that they call EKIN’s.
  • EKIN is divided into different categories, such as soccer, performance, running, and lifestyle. Often other categories come up with the innovation and if it works the lifestyle takes it into their selection.
  • The EKIN’s communicate with consumers, retailers, entertainers, etc. to receive vital feedback that will help the company improve and change the product, and to come up with innovations and products.
  • Nike has come up with great inventions over the years, such as the Zoom Air shoe (1995) and Vapor Max (2017). They use a mix of inventing something new together with innovating.
  • Some Nike apparel technologies’ inventions are pulling the sweat away, drying quickly and for being lightweight and breathable. 

 

Have any comments? Tweet us @ProductSchool 

The Product Book has arrived! Learn how to become a great Product Manager. On sale for a limited time. Get your copy here http://amzn.to/2uJqg9A 

We teach product management courses in San Francisco, Santa Clara, Los Angeles, and New York. To learn more about our upcoming courses and how to apply click over to our course page.